CLASSY CONCOCTIONS

Any glass can hold a drink. . . Classy Concoctions start a conversation.

Vintage Con Cora or Cora Cocktailware?

Surprise it is the Consolidated Lamp and Glass Company.

Con-Cora-LabelThe Consolidated Lamp and Glass Company was the result of the merger of two firms, Fostoria Shade & Lamp Company of Ohio and Wallace and McAfee Company of Pittsburgh in the year 1893.  The company initially had their production facilities in Ohio, but after a fire in 1895, Consolidated moved to a new site in Coraopolis, Pennsylvania.  The main products of Consolidated were art glass shades, lamps, and globes. They also produced functional and decorative globes for both commercial and residential use. Moreover, they created pattern glass tableware such as pitcher sets, butter dishes, and sugar shakers.  By the year 1910, Consolidated was the biggest lighting glass firm in the whole of the United States, employing more than 400 workers.

Consolidated introduced a line of art glass called ‘Martele’ in 1926.  Reuben Haley, who was inspired by Rene Lalique, designed this first line of art glass.  Haley’s ‘Martele’ style glass  featured raised designs with floral, bird and nude motifs.  Martele means ‘hand forged’ or ‘hand wrought’ depicting the raised sculptural forms on his art glass.

A strong interest in the Spanish Colonial Revival Architecture during the mid 1920’s lead the Consolidated Lamp and Glass Company to develop and  introduce a new glassware line called the “Catalonian.”   The Catalonian of 1927 was a reproduction of old Spanish glass from the Catalonia province of Spain.  Toward the end of the roaring 1920’s, the modern, geometric lines of Art Deco become fashionable.  In 1928, a new glassware line went into production called ‘Ruba Rombic.’   The Great Depression caused Consolidated to close down production of its art glass pieces from 1932 until 1936.

1940 marked the end of the Great Depression in America and a change in Consolidated Glass Company.  Consolidated changed the name to ‘Con Cora’ when they released their new milk glass glassware line in 1940.  Consolidated still produced their art glass lines through 1950’s, but in limited production as a response to a new interest in Cocktailware.  Con Cora launched decorative cocktail glassware sets in the 1960’s.  Clear glass blanks were screen printed in a variety of whimiscal patterns and colors with copyright mark ‘Cora.’  The 60’s also marked a time of labor disputes within the glass company.  In 1963, a large fire broke out in the factory from the labor disputes.

Con Cora, once largest glass company in the United States, never re-opened after the devastating fire.

Classy Concoctions has a double old-fashioned tumbler set of six (6) dating to the 1960’s when screen printing on glass blanks became popular.  The glassware set looks like architectural blueprints.  Not a blueprint of a 60’s ranch tract house, rather a blueprint for the Perfect Daiquiri, a Perfect Whiskey Sour and other classic cocktails.  The sets features cocktail recipes for the Daiquiri, Whiskey Sour, Bloody Mary, Dry Martini, Manhattan and the Screwdriver.  View the cocktail set here.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Advertisements

2 comments on “Vintage Con Cora or Cora Cocktailware?

  1. Tom
    October 16, 2014

    The Cora brand of glassware was not produced by the Consolidated Lamp & Glass Company. The Con-Cora line of decorated milk glass items did not begin until 1957. It lasted until 1962. Though Consolidated did produce decorated milk glass in the 1945-1957 period, it had another name, the Regent line. The label pre-1957 stated simply Consolidated Milk Glass. Great site, but please fix the incorrect information.

    Come learn more about the glass made by the Consolidated Glass Company of Coraopolis, PA and by the Phoenix Glass Company of Monaca, PA here:

    https://www.facebook.com/groups/PCGCC/

  2. Teri
    June 28, 2015

    If Consolidated Lamp & Glass Company did not produce the Cora brand, who did? Also, I’ve noticed that a lot of sellers on E-bay and Etsy refer to the same mark as “Cera” or “Cora.” Which is correct?

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s

categories

Count Down Till. . .

New Cocktail SetsSeptember 1st, 2012
The big day is here.
%d bloggers like this: